The Current Situation of Religion
in Los Angeles, 2000-2008

Compiled by Clifton L. Holland

 

The Roman Catholic Church and
associated Eastern Catholic Parishes

Today, Los Angeles is home to adherents of many religions, with Roman Catholicism being the largest due to the high numbers of Hispanic, Filipino, and Irish Americans.  The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles comprises the City of Los Angeles as well as the counties of Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Ventura.  The archdiocese is considered the largest Roman Catholic diocese in the USA in terms of congregant population.  It covers 8,762 square miles (22,430 square kilometers) of territory.  The total Roman Catholic population, as of 2005, stands at 4,349,267 people living among a total population of 11,258,600.

There are 288 RCC parishes located in 120 cities throughout the Archdiocese in the three counties.  There are seven missions and chapels and nine Eastern Catholic parishesArmenian, Assyrian Chaldean, Byzantine-Ruthenian, Coptic, Maronite, Melkite Greek, Russian Greek, Syriac and Ukrainian- Byzantine.  In all, there are a total of 225 Catholic elementary schools serving some 65,000 students, while there are 53 Catholic high schools with about 30,000 students enrolled.   Together they comprise one of the three largest school systems in California in either the public or private sector.  Ethnic services in a very culturally mixed environment are offered to 72 different groups.  These services include clergy, liturgy, social services, publications, counseling, and cultural affairs.

When the City of Los Angeles condemned the old St. Vibiana's Catholic Cathedral (build in 1876) in 1996 due to earthquake damage, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles was left without a Cathedral Church.   With a population of approximately four million Catholics, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles needed a Cathedral Church that could accommodate nearly 3,000 for special Liturgies and services.  The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Los Angeles, Cardinal Roger Mahony, oversaw construction of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, completed in 2002 on West Temple Street in the old Bunker Hill area, near the north end of the downtown civic center.  The cost of the 5.6 acre site for the new Cathedral was $10.85 million, and the final cost of the new cathedral was $189.7 million.  Every detail of the construction was specified to last at least 500 years.  Cardinal Mahony's decision to rebuild the Los Angeles cathedral in such elaborate architecture drew criticism from some, who argued that a church of that size was unnecessary.  The cathedral was also criticized for its departure from traditional Catholic aesthetics. 

See the Christian Science Monitor article on the dedication of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in 2002 at:  http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0909/p03s01-ussc.html

 

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L.A. archdiocese to sell property to fund sexual abuse settlements
By Gillian Flaccus, ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 15, 2007 (partial article)

The Los Angeles [Roman Catholic] Archdiocese will sell its administrative headquarters and perhaps other non-parish properties to help pay upcoming settlements of molestation claims against clergymen, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony said Tuesday.

Attorneys and other representatives for the alleged sexual abuse victims immediately dismissed Mahony's announcement as an attempt to generate sympathy for the archdiocese, which faces more than 500 molestation cases.

If recent payouts are a guide, the final settlement bill could be $500 million to $600 million, and the archdiocese and insurance companies are fighting over how much of the total the church should pay.  Mahony has been under pressure to pay half the amount, as the Diocese of Orange did in a $100-million molestation settlement in 2004.

SOURCE:  http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/state/20070515-2006-ca-churchabuse-calif.html

For more information, see the following articles:  archives.

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See "SoCal's other wayward bishop" (Bishop Tod D. Brown of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange) by Gustavo Arellano in the Los Angeles Times -- October 1, 2007.

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Independent Western Roman Churches

These Old Catholic and other independent Catholic Churches do not recognize the papal authority of the Bishop of Rome of the Roman Catholic Church.  See the religious denominations list for Los Angeles County below under section A2.3-A2.5.

Eastern Orthodox Churches

There are many Eastern Orthodox Churches in the Los Angeles area as the result of the immigration of Eastern Europeans, Middle Easterners and Asians-Indians.  For links to some of these churches, go to:  PROLADES-GLAMA Churches.htm  See the religious denominations list for Los Angeles County below under section A1, Eastern Orthodox Traditions:  Classification System of Religious Groups in the Americas by Major Traditions and Family Types (PDF), compiled by Clifton L. Holland.

The Protestant Movement

According to Dr. John Orr of USC's Center for Religion and Civic Culture (1999), only 26% of the County's Christians are Protestant, and Los Angeles County Protestantism is no longer led by mainline Protestant denominations such as the Presbyterian Church USA, the United Church of Christ, the Christian Church/Disciples of Christ, American Baptist Churches in the USA, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the United Methodist Church and the Episcopal Church.  Only 29% are mainliners--successors of the region's previous mainline "Protestant Establishment."  Although the mainline denominations have experienced decline during the past three decades within Los Angeles County, there are now signs that that decline may be bottoming out.  Between 1990 and 1997, for example, the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America have apparently experienced growth, even as the United Methodist Church and the Presbyterian Church USA have continued their descent.

Among Protestants, 55% are evangelical and 16% are Pentecostal.  In 1906, in what is now the Little Tokyo district of Los Angeles, a revival held on Azusa Street launched an international Pentecostal movement-a movement that, at the end of the century, is being energized by a surge of Latino converts.  Latino Pentecostalism is the major growth area of Southland Protestantism. In the City of Los Angeles, there are about 1,000 Latino Pentecostal churches.  According to a recent national survey by the Tomas Rivera Center, although about 77% of Latinos continue to be affiliated with Roman Catholicism, the momentum is toward affiliation with Pentecostalism.   That momentum is apparent all over the central areas of the city, where neighborhoods housing Latino immigrants host storefront Pentecostal churches, sometimes at a density of two or three to a block. 

SOURCE:  http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/demographics/lacounty.html

See the religious denominations list for Los Angeles County below under section B, The Protestant Movement.

For a list of Christian Bible Colleges, Universities and Theological Seminaries, go to:  Christian Education

Marginal Christian Groups

The term "Marginal Christian" identifies those religious groups that have some affinity with Christianity but whose theology, traditions and practices are outside the mainstream of the major Christian traditions:   Eastern Orthodox, Western Roman Catholic and Protestant.  Included in the Margin Christian category are Christian Science/Religious Science, Christadelphians, Jehovah's Witnesses/The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints/Mormons and related groups, some of the Jesus People groups (Children of God/The Family), the Unification Church of Rev. Moon and other miscellaneous groups, including the following among Hispanics:   God is Love Pentecostal Church (Igreja Pentecostes Deus E Amor, (founded in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 1962 by David Miranda), Growing in Grace Churches (Iglesias Creciendo en Gracia, Miami, FL), Light of the World Church (Iglesia Luz del Mundo, Mexico), Mita Congregation (Congregacion Mita, Puerto Rico), Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (Igreja Universal do Reyno do Deus, founded in Brazil by Bishop Edir Macedo in 1977) and Voice of the Chief Cornerstone (Voz de la Piedra Angular, Puerto Rico).  

See the religious denominations list for Los Angeles County below under section C, Marginal Christian Groups.

For links to Marginal Christian Groups, go to:  PROLADES-GLAMA Churches.htm

The Jewish Community

Other Religions from the Middle East and Asia

Immigrants speaking a variety of languages from many Asian countries, for example, have formed more than 300 Buddhist temples in the Los Angeles area, which some have claimed houses the largest variety of Buddhists in the world (at least 26 varieties).  Los Angeles has been a destination for Swamis and Gurus since the early 1900s, including Paramahansa Yogananda who founded the Self-Realization Fellowship in 1920; currently its headquarters are in Hollywood and it has a private park in Pacific Palisades.  Maharishi Mahesh Yogi founded the Transcendental Meditation movement in Los Angeles in the late 1950s. 

Bahá'í -                      http://www.labc.org/

Buddhism -              http://www.urbandharma.org/wilshire/churches/buddhist.html

                                   http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma4/socenters.html

                                   http://www.urbandharma.org/pdf/CaliforniaBuddhistCenters-Jan.2007.pdf

Hinduism -              http://www.geocities.com/malibutemple/latemp.htm

Islam  -                      http://www.csulb.edu/web/org/msa/islamic_centers_in_california.htm

Shinto /Tenrikyo -  http://philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/shinto/sects.html      

                                    http://philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/shinto/tenrik.html

Sikhism -                  http://www.sikhs.org/  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikhism

Sufism -                    http://godlas.myweb.uga.edu/Sufism.html   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sufism

Zoroastrianism -     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoroastrianism http://www.religioustolerance.org/zoroastr.htm


Also, the Los Angeles area is home to adherents of various Ancient Wisdom, Magick and Psychic-Spiritualist-New Age religions.  One branch of the Theosophist ("god-wisdom") movement is centered in Los Angeles (The United Lodge of Theosophists), and another is in neighboring Pasadena (The Theosophical Society).    The quasi-Jewish Kabbalah Centre (allegedly teaching the principles of Jewish mysticism) was founded in 1984 in Los Angeles.   The famous Wayfarers Chapel (Swedenborgian Church) is located on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in the South Bay subregion of Los Angeles County.  The Church of Scientology was founded in Los Angeles in 1954 by sciencefiction writer L. Ron Hubbard; there are numerous Scientology churches, museums and recruiting sites in the area, most notably the Celebrity Centre in Hollywood; Los Angeles is home to the world's largest community of Scientologists.  There is a large concentation of non-Christian religions in the West Los Angeles-Malibu subregion.  

SOURCES:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles%2C_California    

For links to non-Christian religions, go to:  PROLADES-GLAMA Churches.htm  See the religious denominations list for Los Angeles County below under section D, Non-Christian Religious Groups.

To view the latest information on religious groups in the Los Angeles 5-County Area, go to these links:

http://www.ideaministries.com/searchengine/

http://www.at-la.com/@la-god/index.htm

http://dir.yahoo.com/Regional/U_S__States/California/Metropolitan_Areas/Los_Angeles_Metro/Community/Religion_and_Spirituality/

For a general history of Los Angeles County, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Los_Angeles%2C_California

Search on Los Angeles A to Z: An Encyclopedia of the City and County, Leonard and Dale Pitt, UC Press, 1997 at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jengod/Topics_in_LAAZ

 

* * *

Religious Denominations in Los Angeles County, 2002

As a general introduction to the study of religious groups in Los Angeles, please consult our
Classification System of Religious Groups in the Americas by Major Traditions and Family Types (PDF),
compiled by Clifton L. Holland.

TRADITION CLASCODE DENCODE DENOMINATION_NAME
DENOMINATIONS OF EASTERN ORTHODOX TRADITIONS
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1103 DAOC ANTIOCHIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH (DAMASCUS)
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1202 BUOC BULGARIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1205 COCY CYRIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1210 GROC GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1214 ROOC ROMANIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1215 RUOC RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1216 SEOC SERBIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1219 UKOC UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1304 AMOCC AMERICAN ORTHODOX CATHOLIC CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.13041 GBOCC GOD'S BENEVOLENT ORTHODOX CATHOLIC CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1305 AMOCCK AMERICAN ORTHODOX CATHOLIC CHURCH (KOCHONES)
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.13051 CJJ COMMUNITY OF JAMES THE JUST
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1399 OEOC OTHER ORTHODOX CHURCHES
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.1403 MOLK UNITED MOLOKAN CHURCH OF SPIRITUAL JUMPERS
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2101 NAOC AMERICAN ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2103 BYCC BYZANTINE CATHOLIC CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2105 OCE ORTHODOX CHURCH OF THE EAST
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2106 CSI CHURCH OF SOUTH INDIA
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2201 AAC ARMENIAN APOSTOLIC CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.22021 JSOC JACOBITE SYRIAN ORODOX CHURCH OF INDIA
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2301 COPTO COPTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH
EASTERN ORTHODOX A1.2302 COPA COPTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

DENOMINATIONS OF WESTERN CATHOLIC TRADITIONS

WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.1000 RCC ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH - ARCHDIOCESE OF LOS ANGELES
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.2000 RCRO ROMAN CATHOLIC RELIGIOUS ORDERS
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.303 ACC3 NORTH AMERICAN OLD ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.304 ORCCNA OLD ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.311 PNCC POLISH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.4014 ANGCC ANGLICAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.4099 ACC ARMENIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 AOCC APOSTOLIC OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 CUA CHURCH OF UTRECHT IN AMERICA
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 HOCACP HOLY ORTHODOX CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH IN THE PHILIPPINES
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 MNCC MEXICAN NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 OCCNA OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA (CATHOLIC)
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 PICCA PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENT CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE AMERICAS
WESTERN CATHOLIC A2.5 VCLA THE VALLEY CATHOLIC KOREAN APOSTOLATE

DENOMINATIONS OF THE PROTESTANT MOVEMENT

LUTHERAN B1.101 ELCA EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA
LUTHERAN B1.102 ELS EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD
LUTHERAN B1.103 WELS WISCONSIN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD
LUTHERAN B1.105 LCMS LUTHERAN CHURCH-MISSOURI SYNOD
LUTHERAN B1.110 CLB CHURCH OF THE LUTHERAN CONFESSION
LUTHERAN B1.199 OLC OTHER LUTHERAN CHURCHES
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2101 RCA REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2102 CRC CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2202 RPC REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2206 OPC ORTHODOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2208 PCA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN AMERICA
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.22081 KPCA GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN AMERICA
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2210 PCUSA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH-USA
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2299 CPC CHRISTIAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (KOREAN)
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2301 UCC UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2302 CCCC CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2303 ICC INDEPENDENT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2400 KAPC KOREAN AMERICAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN B1.2400 ORPCC OTHER REFORMED-PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES
ANGLICAN-EPISCOPAL B1.302 PEC PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH
ANABAPTIST-MENNONITE B2.1100 CYMF CALIFORNIA YEARLY MEETING OF FRIENDS
ANABAPTIST-MENNONITE B2.1100 FUM FRIENDS UNITED MEETING
ANABAPTIST-MENNONITE B2.1100 MEN MENNONITE CHURCHES
ANABAPTIST-MENNONITE B2.1100 FRICH SOCIETY OF FRIENDS-QUAKERS
BAPTIST B2.2101 BGC BAPTIST GENERAL CONFERENCE
BAPTIST B2.2103 GAGB GENERAL ASSOCIATION OF GENERAL BAPTISTS
BAPTIST B2.2104 NAFWB NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FREEWILL BAPTISTS
BAPTIST B2.2105 PBC PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
BAPTIST B2.2106 UBC UNITED FREEWILL BAPTIST CHURCH
BAPTIST B2.2303 ABC AMERICAN BAPTIST CHURCHES IN THE USA
BAPTIST B2.2304 BBF BAPTIST BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
BAPTIST B2.2306 BMAA BAPTIST MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
BAPTIST B2.2308 CAMBC CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCHES
BAPTIST B2.2309 CBA CONSERVATIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION
BAPTIST B2.2310 GARB GENERAL ASSOCATION OF REGULAR BAPTISTS
BAPTIST B2.23111 NABC NORTH AMERICAN BAPTIST CONFERENCE
BAPTIST B2.2312 PNBC PROGRESSIVE NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION
BAPTIST B2.2313 NBC NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION
BAPTIST B2.2313 SBC SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION
BAPTIST B2.2314 NBCA NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION OF AMERICA
BAPTIST B2.2317 BMISC OTHER BAPTIST CHURCHES
BAPTIST B2.2399 IBAP INDEPENDENT BAPTIST CHURCHES
PIETIST B2.3102 MCA MORAVIAN CHURCH IN AMERICA
PIETIST B2.3104 CB CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN (ELGIN, IL)
PIETIST B2.31041 BCA BRETHREN CHURCH (ASHLAND, OHIO)
PIETIST B2.31042 FGBC FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES
PIETIST B2.31043 BCCA BRETHREN IN CHRIST CHURCH (ASHLAND, OHIO)
PIETIST B2.31049 OBRCH OTHER BRETHREN CHURCHES
PIETIST B2.32021 AMEZ AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3206 CMEC CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3207 CUBC CHURCH OF THE UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST
PIETIST B2.3209 ECC EVANGELICAL CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3210 EMCA EVANGELICAL METHODIST CHURCH OF AMERICA
PIETIST B2.3218 UMC UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3220 KMC KOREAN METHODIST CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3299 OMC OTHER METHODIST CHURCHES
PIETIST B2.33021 KEFC KOREAN EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
PIETIST B2.3304 ECCA EVANGELICAL COVENANT CHURCH OF AMERICA
PIETIST B2.33041 KECCA KOREAN EVANGELICAL COVENANT CHURCH OF AMERICA
PIETIST B2.3306 EFCA EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.403 IBCH INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCHES
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.404 WLEE WITNESS LEE MOVEMENT
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.405 OFCH THE CHURCH WHICH IS CHRIST'S BODY (JOHNSON)
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.406 IFCA INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST CHURCHES OF AMERICA
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.411 CCA COMMUNITY CHURCHES OF AMERICA
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.499 CPC CONCORDANT PUBLISHING CONCERN
INDEPENDENT FUNDAMENTALIST B2.499 FBCH FUNDAMENTAL BIBLE CHURCH
HOLINESS B2.503 ACCN APOSTOLIC CHRISTIAN CHURCH
HOLINESS B2.505 CMA CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE
HOLINESS B2.5051 COCH CHURCH OF CHRIST HOLINESS
HOLINESS B2.507 COGA CHURCH OF GOD (ANDERSON, IN)
HOLINESS B2.508 COGH CHURCH OF GOD (HOLINESS)
HOLINESS B2.5091 CNAZ CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
HOLINESS B2.513 FMCNA FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA
HOLINESS B2.517 PFCH PILLAR OF FIRE CHURCHES
HOLINESS B2.518 SARMY THE SALVATION ARMY
HOLINESS B2.519 TMC THE MISSIONARY CHURCH
HOLINESS B2.521 WCH WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH
HOLINESS B2.524 OMSHCNA ORIENTAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY HOLINESS CHURCH OF N.A.
HOLINESS B2.599 ACCH ASSOCIATED CHURCHES OF CHRIST (HOLINESS)
HOLINESS B2.599 MCSWF MISSIONARY CHRISTIAN AND SOUL WINNING FELLOWSHIP
HOLINESS B2.599 OHOLI OTHER HOLINESS CHURCHES
HOLINESS B2.599 TCKGC TRIUMPH THE CHURCH & KING CHURCHES
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.601 CCDC CHRISTIAN CHURCH-DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.602 TCCON THE CHRISTIAN CONGREGATION
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.603 CCNI CHRISTIAN CHURCHES NON-INSTRUMENTAL
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.604 CCI CHRISTIAN CHURCHES-INSTRUMENTAL
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.6041 CCCOC CHRISTIAN CHURCHES & CHURCHES OF CHRIST
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.6042 CIC COMPAÑERISMO DE IGLESIAS CRISTIANAS
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.699 ICC INTERNATIONAL CHURCHES OF CHRIST
RESTORATION MOVEMENT B2.699 OCC OTHER CHURCHES OF CHRIST
ADVENTIST B3.1 SDAGC SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH, GEN. CONF.
ADVENTIST B3.2 ACC ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
ADVENTIST B3.301 COGSD CHURCH OF GOD SEVENTH-DAY (DENVER,CO)
ADVENTIST B3.305 IDI IGLESIA DE DIOS ISRAELITA (ISRAELITE CHURCH OF GOD-MEXICO)
ADVENTIST B3.31 SDCOG SEVENTH-DAY CHURCH OF GOD
ADVENTIST B3.500 WCOG WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD (POST-ARMSTRONG)
ADVENTIST B3.685 KGEWM KINGDOM OF GOD ON EARTH WITHIN MAN
PENTECOSTAL B4.0105 CAPRO IGLESIA DE LOS APOSTOLES Y PROFETAS
PENTECOSTAL B4.0109 OAFC OTHER APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.02011 AIC ASOCIACION DE IGLESIAS CRISTIANAS
PENTECOSTAL B4.0202 COGC CHURCH OF GOD (CLEVELAND, TN)
PENTECOSTAL B4.02051 PCOG PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
PENTECOSTAL B4.02062 COGIC CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
PENTECOSTAL B4.0207 COGP CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHESY
PENTECOSTAL B4.02071 CLGPGT CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD, PILLAR & GROUND OF TRUTH
PENTECOSTAL B4.0209 FBHC FIRE BAPTIZED HOLINESS CHURCH
PENTECOSTAL B4.021 CLGCWFF CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD CWFF
PENTECOSTAL B4.0210 CLADIC CONCILIO LATINOAMERICANO DE IGLESIAS CRISTIANAS
PENTECOSTAL B4.0210 CLADIC LATIN AMERICAN COUNCIL OF CHRISTIAN CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.0214 PHC PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
PENTECOSTAL B4.02141 UHPRA UNITED HOUSE OF PRAYER
PENTECOSTAL B4.0301 AAFCJ ASAMBLEA APOSTOLICA DE LA FE EN CRISTO JESUS
PENTECOSTAL B4.0303 BWCLJC BIBLE WAY CHURCH OF THE LORD JESUS CHRIST
PENTECOSTAL B4.0305 PAJC PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLY OF JESUS CHRIST
PENTECOSTAL B4.0401 AGGC ASSEMBLIES OF GOD, GEN. COUNCIL
PENTECOSTAL B4.04011 IDPMI IGLESIA DE DIOS PENTECOSTAL, MI
PENTECOSTAL B4.04013 KAOG KOREAN AMERICAN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD
PENTECOSTAL B4.04016 AEPP IGLESIAS EVANGELICAS DEL PRINCIPE DE PAZ (PRINCE OF PEACE)
PENTECOSTAL B4.0405 DFE DEFENSORES DE LA FE (DEFENDERS OF THE FAITH)
PENTECOSTAL B4.0406 ICFG INTERNATIONAL CHURCH OF THE FOURSQUARE GOSPEL
PENTECOSTAL B4.0408 MMM MOVIMIENTO MISIONERO MUNDIAL
PENTECOSTAL B4.0409 OBSC OPEN BIBLE STANDARD CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.0410 PCGA PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD OF AMERICA
PENTECOSTAL B4.0411 VO VICTORY OUTREACH
PENTECOSTAL B4.0501 IECSC IGLESIA EVANGELICAL INTERNACIONAL
PENTECOSTAL B4.0602 FGFCMI FULL GOSPEL FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
PENTECOSTAL B4.0799 CLW CHURCH OF THE LIVING WORD
PENTECOSTAL B4.0801 AVCH ASSOCIATION OF VINEYARD CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.0802 MCCH MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.0805 CALCH CALVARY CHAPEL
PENTECOSTAL B4.1002 FICWFM FELLOWSHIP OF INTER-CITY WORD OF FAITH MINISTRIES
PENTECOSTAL B4.1004 OWOF OTHER WORD OF FAITH CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 CENTRUM CENTRUM OF HOLLYWOOD (SPONSORED BY YOUTH WITH A MISSION, YWAM)
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 CEH CHRIST EXTENDED HAND & RECOVERY MINISTRIES
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 CFMIS CHRIST FAITH MISSION
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 IJC IGLESIA DE JESUCRISTO
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 IECR INTERNATIONAL EVANGELISM CRUSADES
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 ISCC INTERNATIONAL SOUL CLINIC CHURCH (FOUNDED BY FRED JORDON)
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 IPCOC INTL PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 KWMOLJC KINGDOM AND WORLD MISSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 OPEN OTHER PENTECOSTAL CHURCHES
PENTECOSTAL B4.1100 UWC UNIVERSAL WORLD CHURCH
PROTESTANT-UNCLASSIFIED B5.0 MCCUP METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCHES, UNIVERSAL FELLOWSHIP OF
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 ICCC INDEPENDENT CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY CHURCHES
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 ICCH INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY CHURCHES
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 NCHUR NEIGHBORHOOD FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 NSM NORWEGIAN SEAMAN'S MISSION
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 AWEM ORIENTAL MISSION CHURCH
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 OCOM OTHER COMMUNIITY CHURCHES
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 INDNP OTHER INDEPENDENT NON-PENTECOSTAL CHURCHES
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 UNIN UNION CHURCHES
NON-DENOMINATIONAL B6.0 RMIS UNION RESCUE MISSION
DENOMINATIONS OF MARGINAL CHRISTIAN TRADITIONS
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.03 JWIT JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.05 WWCOG WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD (HERBERT W. ARMSTRONG)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.052 ICOG INTERNATIONAL CHURCH OF GOD (GARNER TED ARMSTRONG)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.053 COGPE CHURCH OF GOD, PHILADELPHIA ERA
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.054 TPMCOG TRIUMPH PROPHETIC MINISTRIES (CHURCH OF GOD)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C1.055 WII WORLD INSIGHT INTERNATIONAL
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C4.01 LDS CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C4.02 RLDS REORGANIZED CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST LDS
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C4.99 CFB CHURCH OF THE FIRST BORN
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.101 CCS CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST (MARY BAKER EDDY)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.102 ICC INDEPENDENT CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.103 UCRS UNITED CHURCH OF RELIGIOUS SCIENCE (ERNEST HOLMES)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.104 RSI RELIGIOUS SCIENCE INTERNATIONAL
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.105 IMA INTERNATIONAL METAPHYSICAL ASSOCIATION
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.201 USC UNITY SCHOOL OF CHRISTIANITY
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.203 IDMRS INSTITUTE OF DIVINE METAPHYSICAL RELIGIOUS SCIENCE
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.204 CHTRU CHURCH OF TRUTH (INTERNATIONAL ALLIANCE OF CHURCHES OF TRUTH)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C6.206 SNIE SEICHO-NO-IE (HOME OF INFINITE LIFE, WISDOM AND ABSOLUTE TRUTH)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0101 CDEL CHRISTADELPHIANS
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0401 INIC IGLESIA NI CRISTO (CHURCH OF CHRIST-PHILIPPINES)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0402 MOON UNIFICATION CHURCH (REV. SUN MYUNG MOON, KOREA)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0403 CMC CHUNDOKWAN MISSIONARY CHURCH (KOREANS)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0501 LZDM IGLESIA LUZ DEL MUNDO (LIGHT OF THE WORLD CHURCH)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0503 VPA LA VOZ DE LA PIEDRA ANGULAR (VOICE OF THE CHIEF CORNERSTONE-PUERTO RICO)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0505 IURD IGLESIA UNIVERSAL DEL REINO DE DIOS (UNIVERSAL CHURCH OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD-BRAZIL)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.0506 IDA IGLESIA DIOS ES AMOR (GOD IS LOVE CHURCH-BRAZIL)
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.09 ULC UNIVERSAL LIFE CHURCH
MARGINAL CHRISTIAN C7.09 ULTIR UNIVERSAL LIFE-THE INNER RELIGION
NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
BUDDHIST D1.1 ADA ABBOT OF DENKYO-AN
BUDDHIST D1.1 ABCONG AMERICAN BUDDHIST CONGRESS
BUDDHIST D1.1 AAVC ANANDA ASHRAMA AND VEDANTA CENTRE
BUDDHIST D1.1 AUMN AUM NAMO BHAGAVATE VASUDEVAYA FOUNDATION
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH BUDDHIST
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH BUDDHIST SANGHA COUNCIL OF SO CAL
BUDDHIST D1.1 CBOSAT CALIFORNIA BOSATSUKAI
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH HIGASHI HONGWANJI BUDDHIST
BUDDHIST D1.1 IBPC INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST PROGRESS SOCIETY
BUDDHIST D1.1 IZIA INTERNATIONAL ZEN INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH INT'L BUDDHIST MEDITATION CENTER
BUDDHIST D1.1 KZBT KANZEONJI ZEN BUDDHIST TEMPLE
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH KONKO KYO, C/O KONKO CHURCH OF LOS ANGELES
BUDDHIST D1.1 KBCO KOREAN BUDDHIST CHOGYE ORDER, C/O KWAN UM SA TEMPLE
BUDDHIST D1.1 LBSUSA LAO BUDDHIST SANGHA OF THE U.S.A.
BUDDHIST D1.1 MAHIK-1 MAHIKARI OF AMERICA
BUDDHIST D1.1 PHODA PHO DA SON QUAN AM PO (VIETNAMESE BUDDHIST)
BUDDHIST D1.1 RA REIYUKAI AMERICA
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH RINZAI-JI, INC., C/O CIMARRON ZEN CENTER
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH RISSHO KOSEI KAI BUDDHIST
BUDDHIST D1.1 RUSA RYUGU, U.S.A.
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH SAKYA THUBTEN DHARGE LING
BUDDHIST D1.1 TABA THAI-AMERICAN BUDDHIST ASSOCIATION, C/0 WAT THAI OF LOS ANGELES
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH VIETNAMESE UNITED BUDDHIST
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH ZEN CENTER OF LOS ANGELES
BUDDHIST D1.1 BUDH ZENSHUJI SOTO MISSION
CHINESE RELIGIONS D1.2 TAO SHRINE OF THE ETERNAL BREATH OF TAO
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 CWM CHURCH OF WORLD MESSIANITY
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 SHIN NICHIREN SHOSHU OF AMERICA
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 PLK PERFECT LIBERTY KYODAN
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 REIHA REIHA-NO-HIKARI KYODAI CHURCH (SHINTO-BASED NEW RELIGION)
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 SEICHO SEICHO NO IE CHURCH
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 TENR TENRIKYO MISSION HEADQUARTERS USA
JAPANESE RELIGIONS D1.3 TENSH TENSHINKYO HONCHO (DIVINE MIND TEACHINGS-SPIRITUAL WARRIOR)
HINDU D2.1 HINDU AVATAR MEHER BABA CENTER
HINDU D2.1 DEVA DEVA FOUNDATION
HINDU D2.1 DAC DIVINE AWARENESS CENTER
HINDU D2.1 HINDU HINDU TEMPLE SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
HINDU D2.1 ISCON INTL SOC FOR KRISHNA CONSCIOUSNESS (HARE KRISHNAS)
HINDU D2.1 LILA LILA
HINDU D2.1 YOGA PURNA YOGA
HINDU D2.1 SAIF S.A.I. FOUNDATION
HINDU D2.1 SAEEJIS SAEEJIS TEMPLE OF PEACE
HINDU D2.1 YOGA SAHAJA YOGA CENTERS
HINDU D2.1 SM SARVAMANGALA MISSION
HINDU D2.1 SWR SATSANG WITH ROBERT
HINDU D2.1 SRF SELF-REALIZATION FELLOWSHIP
HINDU D2.1 YOGA SIDDHA YOGA DHAM
HINDU D2.1 TM TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION
HINDU D2.1 VEDA VEDANTA SOCIETY
HINDU D2.1 VEDA VEDIC REVELATION CHURCH
HINDU D2.1 VC VENDANTIC CENTER
HINDU D2.1 WCS WORLD COMMUNITY SERVICE
JAIN D2.2 JAIN JAIN
JAIN D2.2 JAIN RAMA SEMINARS
SIKH D2.3 ECK ECKANKAR SATSANG SOCIETY
SIKH D2.3 ELANV ELAN VITAL
SIKH D2.3 SIKH SIKH
SIKH D2.3 SIKH SIKH DHARMA
SANT MAT D2.4 DSLS DIVINE SCIENCE OF LIGHT AND SOUND
SANT MAT D2.4 MPATH MASTERPATH
SANT MAT D2.4 MSIA MOVEMENT OF SPIRITUAL INNER AWARENESS
JUDAISM D3.01 JUD ORTHODOX JUDAISM
JUDAISM D3.02 CJUD CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM
JUDAISM D3.03 ORJUD RECONSTRUCTIONIST JUDAISM
JUDAISM D3.04 REFJUD REFORM JUDAISM
JUDAISM D3.05 OJUD CHABAD JUDAISM
ISLAM D4.2 ISLAM ISLAM (VARIOUS SECTS)
BAHA'I D4.3 BAHAI BAHAÍ
ANIMISM B5.0 ANIM GARIFUNA RELIGION
ANIMISM D5.0 ANIM JACUMBA CHURCH
ANIMISM D5.0 MYAL MYALISM-OBEAH (JAMAICA & WEST INDIES)
ANIMISM D5.0 RASTA RASTAFARIANISM (JAMAICA & WEST INDIES)
ANIMISM D5.0 SANT SANTERIA (CUBA & PUERTO RICO)
ANIMISM D5.0 VUDU VODOU (HAITI)
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 ARWT AMON RA WISDOM TEMPLE
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 CIL CHURCH OF ILLUMINATION
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 GNOS ECCLESIA
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 ECCGN ECCLESIA GNOSTICA (ECCGN) - THE GNOSTIC SOCIETY
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 FLVXO FRATERNITAS L.V.X. OCCULTA (FRATERNITY OF THE HIDDEN LIGHT)
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 GACAA GNOSTIC ASSOCIATION OF CULTURAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 OWSJ ORDER OF THE WHITE SHRINE JERUSALEM
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 OTA ORDO TEMPLI ASTARTE - ORDER OF THE TEMPLE OF ASTARTE
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.01 IGCU THE GNOSTIC CENTER OF LOS ANGELES (IGLESIA GNOSTICA CRISTIANA UNIVERSAL)
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.04 BOTA BUILDERS OF THE ADYTUM (BADYT)
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.04 COG COVENANT OF THE GODDESS-SO. CALIF. COUNCIL
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.08 PHILRS PHILOSOPHICAL RESEARCH SOCIETY
ANCIENT WISDOM D6.09 CLIGHT CHURCH OF LIGHT (CLIGHT)
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 CCOS CHURCH OF COSMIC LIGHT
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 NSA SPRITUALIST CHURCH OF REVELATION
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 SUPER SUPERET LIGHT DOCTRINE CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 SPIR UNITED SPIRITUALIST CHURCH HQ
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 SPIR UNIVERSAL HAGAR SPIRITUAL CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.01 USC UNIVERSE SOCIETY CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.02 SWED SWEDENBORGIAN NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.02 SWED WAYFARERS' CHAPEL-SWEDENBORG
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.03 TS THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.03 THEOS THEOSOPHY HALL
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.03 ULT UNITED LODGE OF THEOSOPHISTS
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.04 TEASP SANCTUARY OF TRUTH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.05 LCAT UNITED LIBERAL CATHOLIC CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.07 AQUAR AQUARIAN EDUCATIONAL GROUP
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.07 TARA TARA CENTER
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.08 IAMR I AM ROSE OF LIGHT TEMPLE
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.08 IAMO MORNINGLAND TEMPLE
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 AESOC AETHERIUS SOCIETY
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 ARCFN ANN REE COLTON FOUNDATION OF NISCIENCE
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 ARCANA ARCANA WORKSHOPS
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 ASLI ASPECTS OF LIGHT
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 CGPS CHURCH OF GENERAL PSIONICS
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 SCIE CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 CES CHURCH OF THE ETERNAL SOURCE
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 EDL EMISSARIES OF DIVINE LIGHT
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 AQUAF FIRST AQUARIAN CHURCH OF CHRIST
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 ICCH INNER CIRCLE CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 LCH LUMINARY CHURCH-HOLISTIC
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 NABPC NEW AGE BIBLE AND PHILOSOPHY CENTER
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 PRC PHILOSOPHICO RELIGIOUS CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 PNC PRE-NICENE CHURCH (DE PALATINE)
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 SSSC SEMJASE SILVER STAR CENTER, C/O CALIFORNIA STUDY GROUP
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 MISC SOCIETY-EVOLVING-SELF-MAT
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 STARL STARLIGHT CHURCH
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 TIC TEACHING OF THE INNER CHRIST
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 MISC TEMPLE OF MAN
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 TEG TEMPLE OF THE ELDER GODS
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 TALL THE ASSOCIATION OF LOVE AND LIGHT
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 TIM THOMAS INSTITUTE OF METAPHYSICS
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 UDTLLL UNIV DOM TEMPLE OF LOVE, LIGHT & LIFE
PSYCHIC-SPIRITUALISM-NEW AGE D7.09 UWB UNIVERSAL WHITE BROTHERHOOD, C/O PROSVETA U.S.A.
ATHEIST F1.0 AU ATHEISTS UNITED
ATHEIST F1.0 EC LOS ANGELES ETHICAL CULTURE
AGNOSTIC F2.0 UU UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST
UNCLASSIFIED RELIGIOUS GROUPS
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL BYZANTINE DIOCESE
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL DAWN OF ENLIGHTENMENT
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL EARLY CHURCH OF KOREANS
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL FOLLOWERS OF THE GREAT MOTHER
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL GREAT I AM
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL HUMAN ALMA
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL JOELS WORLD CHURCH OF LOVE
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL JOURNEY: A SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL MISSION MARIA STELLA MARDOSEWICZ (POLISH CATHOLIC MARTYR)
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL NEHKLANK TEMPLE OF AMERICA
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL ROCK OF LOS ANGELES
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL SANJAYA
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL SANSEI DODAN OF AMERICA
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL SHRAVAN
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL SOCIETY OF STEPHEN
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL SPIRITUAL ALLIANCE OF TRUTH
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL THE CHURCH OF TOMORROW INC
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL THE NEW CHURCH OF HOLLYWOOD
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL THE RESCUE ARMY
UNCLASSIFIED G1.0 UNCL UNION-ARMENIAN BROTHERHOOD

CREATED BY CLIFTON L. HOLLAND OF PROLADES ON 20 SEPTEMBER 2002

THE GLAMA DATABASE INCLUDES  8,896 CONGREGATIONAL LISTINGS FOR LOS ANGELES COUNTY,
WHICH ARE RELATED TO THE 370 DENOMINATIONAL LISTINGS ABOVE.

NOTE:  CLEAN UP THIS LIST AS TO "UNCLASSIFIED" GROUPS


* * *

 

Los Angeles is the most religiously diverse city in the world

by John Orr

USC's Center for Religion and Civic Culture, 1999


At a meeting sponsored by the Center for Religion and Civic Culture, a politically active Protestant denominational leader expressed frustration:  "It's wrong to say there is a Los Angeles religious community," he argued.  "In fact, we're incredibly fragmented.  I'm often introduced to people who I'm told are important religious figures in Los Angeles.  To tell you the truth, I've never heard of most of them."

The frustration expressed by this denominational executive probably could not have been avoided as Los Angeles has by-passed London and New York as the world's most religiously pluralist metropolitan region.  More than 600 separate faith communities have established religious centers in Los Angeles neighborhoods, and these communities conduct their affairs in a large number of different languages and in a large number of racial/ethnic enclaves.  Most of their clergy are strangers to one another.

During the 1920s and 1930s Los Angeles was a bastion of Anglo Protestantism, reflecting the values of Midwestern parishioners who had been carried to the Southland on the Southern Pacific Railroad.  Well into the 1970s, Protestant denominational leaders enjoyed comfortable, influential ties with the city is still-strong "downtown business establishment," which itself was largely Protestant.

The Immigration Act of 1965, however, created the condition for a radically different religious future for the City of Angels-a future that would anoint Roman Catholicism as the area's dominant religious group.  Today Roman Catholicism is the single largest faith tradition in Los Angeles County, with 294 parishes and 3,631,368 adherents.  Among Christians, 71% are Catholics.  Between 1980 and 1997, Roman Catholicism experienced a 36% growth.

According to Louis Velasquez, director of the Los Angeles Archdiocese Office of Hispanic Ministry, approximately 70% of Roman Catholics in Los Angeles County are Latino, mostly immigrants from Mexico and Central America.

Father Gregory Courier, speaking for the three-county Los Angeles Archdiocese, suggests that as many as one million undocumented immigrant Catholics probably remain uncounted.   Sixty-percent of these Latino Catholics, Valasquez says, speak Spanish as their primary language. Spanish masses are held at over two thirds of the Archdiocese's 287 parishes, and in most of these parishes, Spanish language masses make up about 80% of the total number of masses offered.

An additional 10% of Roman Catholics in Los Angeles County are Asian, weighted toward first and second generation immigrants from East Asia, especially from Korea and the Philippines. Nine percent are African-American.

Today only 26% of the County's Christians are Protestant, and Los Angeles County Protestantism is no longer led by mainline Protestant denominations such as the Presbyterian Church USA, the United Church of Christ, the Disciples of Christ, American Baptist, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the United Methodist Church, and the Episcopal Church.  Only 29% are mainliners--successors of the region's previous mainline "Protestant Establishment."  Although the mainline denominations have experienced decline during the past three decades within Los Angeles County, there are now signs that that decline may be bottoming out.  Between 1990 and 1997, for example, the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America have apparently experienced growth, even as the United Methodist Church and the Presbyterian Church USA have continued their descent.

Among Protestants, 55% are evangelical and 16% are Pentecostal.  In 1906, in what is now the Little Tokyo district of Los Angeles, a revival held on Azusa Street launched an international Pentecostal movement-a movement that, at the end of the century, is being energized by a surge of Latino converts.  Latino Pentecostalism is the major growth area of Southland Protestantism. In the City of Los Angeles, there are about 1,000 Latino Pentecostal churches.  According to a recent national survey by the Tomas Rivera Center, although about 77% of Latinos continue to be affiliated with Roman Catholicism, the momentum is toward affiliation with Pentecostalism.   That momentum is apparent all over the central areas of the city, where neighborhoods housing Latino immigrants host storefront Pentecostal churches, sometimes at a density of two or three to a block.

Los Angeles County's Jewish community appears to be experiencing a slight growth, from approximately 503,000 in the mid-to-late 1980s to approximately 519,000 in 1997.  Of these, approximately 34% are affiliated with temples and synagogues. In 1990, Jews made up 10.3% of the population that identified with Judeo-Christian traditions.

There are roughly 30,000 Iranian Jews in Los Angeles.   Most live in Los Angeles's exclusive West Side.  Eighty-five percent are self-employed.   Their employment is concentrated in sales, technology, and administrative support services.  After their arrival in Los Angeles, about 90% of Iranian Jews maintain their pre-immigration level of religious practice.

According to anecdotal reports, attendance at Buddhist temples and meditation centers is rapidly growing in Los Angeles County.  There currently are 131 Buddhist temples and meditation centers in Los Angeles County.

Islam is also on the rise, making Southern California the third largest concentration of practicing Muslims in the United States, with 58 mosques, community centers, and study centers in Los Angeles County.  According to J. Gordon Melton, who regularly charts the growth and decline of the nation's faith traditions, 40% of American Buddhists and Muslims reside in Southern California.

In Los Angeles County, there are 6 Bahai worship centers, 18 Hindu temples, 16 Shinto worship centers, and 28 Tenrikyo churches and fellowships.

Southern California is the largest growth area in the United States for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  Nevertheless, Mormonism in Los Angeles County experienced a slight decline between 1990 and 1997-from 103,286 to 96,300 members, probably because of an outflow of members to the Inland Empire.

Source: John Orr, Religion and Multiethnicity in Los Angeles, Center for Religion and Civic Culture, University of Southern California, 1999.

 

Los Angeles County's Ten Largest Faith Groups in 2000

Religious Group Number of temples, churches, mosques or synagogues Number of adherents % of total population % of total adherents
Roman Catholic 278 3,806,377 40 68.8
Jewish 202 564,700 5.9 10.2
Southern Baptist Conv. 312 111,634 1.2 2
Mormon 239 97,347 1 1.8
Muslim 48 92,919 1 1.7
American Baptist Chrs. 211 73,217 0.8 1.3
Independent Charismatic 11 71,500 0.8 1.3
Assemblies of God 260 64,327 0.7 1.2
United Methodist 177 54,676 0.6 1
Intl Foursquare Gospel 225 52,362 0.6 0.9

Religious Congregations and Membership in the United States:  2000, Glenmary Research Center, Nashville, TN

 

Selected Non-Christian Religious Traditions in Los Angeles County: 2000

Religious Group Number of temples, mosques, or synagogues Number of adherents % of total population % of total adherents
Baha'i 44 6,346 NA* NA*
Hindu 37 NA* NA* NA*
Muslim 48 92,919 1 1.7
Jewish 202 564,700 5.9 10.2
Sikh 14 NA* NA* NA*
Buddhist 145 NA* NA* NA*

Religious Congregations and Membership in the United States: 2000, Glenmary Research Center, Nashville, TN
* Data not available

SOURCE:  http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/demographics/lacounty.html

 * * *

Religious Congregations and Membership in the Los Angeles CSMA
(5-County Consolidated Statistical Metropolitan Area)

SOURCE:  American Religion Data Archive - ARDA/Glenmary Research Center:  1990, 2000

Top 15 Reporting Religious Bodies:  Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA (CMSA)

Los Angeles-Long Beach

Los Angeles County

Orange County

Riverside County

San Bernardino County

Ventura County

NOTE:  The ARDA-Glenmary Research Center Database lists 7,079 congregations of all religious groups for the Los Angeles 5-country region (CMSA) in 2000, whereas the PROLADES database documents the existance of 12,460 congregations for the same geographical region in 1997.  Therefore, the Glenmary data should be considered partial and incomplete based on this comparision.

LOS ANGELES COUNTY DATA COMPARISON:

The ARDA-Glenmary Database lists 122 denominations and 4,044 congregations for Los Angeles County in 2000, whereas the PROLADES-GLAMA Database lists 371 denominations and 8,896 congregations for Los Angeles County in 1997.  See the following summary report for details: LACO Denominational List, 1997.

* * *

CMSA / Census Population Change, 1990 to 2000

CMSA |      |                                                                    |-------------------------------|----------------------
Code | Rank | Area Name                                                          | April 1, 2000 | April 1, 1990 |    Number |   Percent
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5602      1   New York--Northern New Jersey--Long Island, NY--NJ--CT--PA CMSA        21,199,865      19,549,649      1,650,216      8.4%
4472      2   Los Angeles--Riverside--Orange County, CA CMSA                         16,373,645      14,531,529     1,842,116     12.7%
1602      3   Chicago--Gary--Kenosha, IL--IN--WI CMSA                                 9,157,540       8,239,820       917,720     11.1%
8872      4   Washington--Baltimore, DC--MD--VA--WV CMSA                              7,608,070       6,727,050       881,020     13.1%
7362      5   San Francisco--Oakland--San Jose, CA CMSA                               7,039,362       6,253,311       786,051     12.6%
6162      6   Philadelphia--Wilmington--Atlantic City, PA--NJ--DE--MD CMSA            6,188,463       5,892,937       295,526      5.0%
1122      7   Boston--Worcester--Lawrence, MA--NH--ME--CT CMSA                        5,819,100       5,455,403       363,697      6.7%
2162      8   Detroit--Ann Arbor--Flint, MI CMSA                                      5,456,428       5,187,171       269,257      5.2%
1922      9   Dallas--Fort Worth, TX CMSA                                             5,221,801       4,037,282      1,184,519     29.3%
3362     10   Houston--Galveston--Brazoria, TX CMSA                                   4,669,571       3,731,131       938,440     25.2%
0520     11   Atlanta, GA MSA                                                         4,112,198       2,959,950     1,152,248     38.9%
4992     12   Miami--Fort Lauderdale, FL CMSA                                         3,876,380       3,192,582       683,798     21.4%
7602     13   Seattle--Tacoma--Bremerton, WA CMSA                                     3,554,760       2,970,328       584,432     19.7%

SOURCE:  http://www.census.gov/population/cen2000/phc-t3/tab03.txt


* * *

Immigrant Religion in the Center of Angels
Donald E. Miller, Jon Miller and Grace R. Dyrness
Los Angeles:  Center for Religion and Civic Culture, USC, 2001


Excerts from the Executive Summary follows.

LO S A N G E L E S is a major gateway city for new immigrants and is already home to a population where one person in three is foreign born.  Given the context of this amazing demographic shift, in the fall of 1998 the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture launched a two-year research project to study the role of religion for new immigrants to Los Angeles.

The traditional view of the role of religion in the lives of immigrants stressed assimilation.  Thus, the great melting pot subsumed cultures of origin and created an American identity that was tied to one of three religions:  Protestant, Catholic, or Jewish.  Today, a new paradigm of segmented assimilation is a more apt description of the ways in which immigrants adjust to life in the United States.  Religious institutions, rather than merely incorporating people into the American mainstream, serve the dual functions of preserving national identities and aiding incorporation.

While immigration is affecting the entire nation, there is no question that immigrants are transforming the face of the existing religious marketplace in Los Angeles. Religious institutions are refocusing their efforts to accommodate the growing numbers of immigrants by altering their worship styles, creating multiple congregations inside the walls of a single church building, and seeking ways to show solidarity with immigrants.   Moreover, denominations are creating innovative models to meet the social service needs of new arrivals to Los Angeles.  Religion for new immigrants certainly includes the search for truth, but is also a human community that nurtures, expresses compassion, and challenges individuals to live up to their potential.  Many immigrants who arrive without extended family and a social safety net are drawn to congregations.  These congregations offer a safe haven, connection with the home country, a place to exercise leadership abilities, and formal and informal social services.  For women, the new country often offers a greater sense of freedom and autonomy.

The most compelling finding during these first two years of research is that immigrants are a potential source of moral renewal at a challenging moment in United States history.  The decline of civility, shared effort and civic cooperation in Western democracies is a legitimate concern in our civic context. Anchored in community, immigrants know something about extended family ties, the value of community, and the importance of preserving a cultural heritage while contributing to the new society. Immigrant congregations are contributing to the religious and civic fabric of Los Angeles.  These institutions play an important role in the process of incorporating new immigrants into American society and play a mediating role to help maintain the values connected with their places of origin.

NOTE: To view the entire document, go to:  http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/private/docs/publications/immigrantreligion.pdf

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Los Angeles Times - Opinion - January 5, 2003

A Revival Under Many Tents in L.A.
The area's religiosity has new faces and speaks in multiple tongues. Yet Los Angeles
is increasingly demonstrating how faith can be a common ground.


By Joel Kotkin and Karen Speicher

From the suburban fringes to South-Central and the heart of downtown, the Los Angeles area is undergoing a remarkable and exuberant expansion of churches, mosques, Buddhist temples and synagogues. The best known of the new religious institutions is the $189-million Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in downtown Los Angeles. But the building program is remarkably varied and includes megachurches for evangelicals, the 1,600-seat Korean Valley Christian Presbyterian Church in Porter Ranch, the Faithful Central Bible Church at the former site of the 17,500-seat Forum in Inglewood and the Hindu Temple in Malibu.

The upsurge in religious building reflects an intensification of faith-based activities across the region. Church membership in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, according to the American Religion Data Archive, grew 24% in the 1990s, a rate of growth about twice that of the area's population. In contrast, membership growth nationally was flat.

This growth has numerous sources, most significantly the number of immigrants who have migrated to the Los Angeles area over the last few decades. Virtually all major denominations, from Catholicism and Judaism to Islam and evangelical Protestantism, credit much of their recent expansion to the spiritual demands of newcomers. Others note the rising need among L.A.'s dispersed middle-class population for a community connection in a city whose sprawl and high-pitched energy are obstacles to simple human contact.

The revival in religiosity represents a new stage in the evolution of Los Angeles as a city. It reflects both the city's changing character and its continuing spiritual restlessness.  From Mesopotamian times on through the Middle Ages to the great Protestant revivals in Britain and America in the early 20th century, the quest for spiritual meaning has been among the most notable characteristics of great cities. "The city," observed French theologian Jacques Ellul, "is not just a collection of houses with ramparts, but also a spiritual power."

A heightened sense of religiosity is nothing new in Los Angeles. Founded as an exclusively Catholic city under the Spanish, L.A.'s first great religious transformation came with the huge influx of Midwestern and Northeastern middle-class Americans at the turn of the century.  By the 1920s, the city was a bastion of such traditional Protestant groups as the [Baptists,] Methodists, Presbyterians and Anglicans.

The city's new Protestant consciousness had many positive effects. Mainstream Protestantism preached the importance of hard work and clean government, values that played crucial roles in the city's transition from a cow town to a major metropolis. But Protestant hegemony also fostered prejudice against other religions, effectively excluding their followers, most notably Catholics and Jews, from the city's ruling elites.

Also in the 1920s and especially during the 1930s, Los Angeles became a national center of Christian fundamentalism.  Impoverished refugees from the Dust Bowl, cut off from their Great Plains roots and adrift in a large, seemingly unknowable city, found solace in the "old-time religion" of such evangelists as [Charles E. Fuller of the Church of the Open Door] and Aimee Semple McPherson of the Foursquare Gospel Church.

In the ensuing decades, many marginal religious movements, from astrologers to faith healers, attracted followings. "Los Angeles leads the world in all the healing sciences," commented the journalist Morrow Mayo, "except perhaps medicine and surgery."

In the 1950s and 1960s, religion in Los Angeles fit a more normal American pattern.  In a city of big businesses and global ambitions, L.A.'s religious communities were represented by "serious" ecclesiastical leaders such as the Catholic archbishop, the leader of the Episcopal church and the head of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles.

This staid corporate model no longer describes L.A.'s religiosity. Although established religious institutions still matter, the current revival of religious life is essentially entrepreneurial, which befits a city that is ethnically diverse and whose economy is dominated by small businesses. It is dispersed and fragmented, unfolding across an archipelago of faiths rather than in a single, sacred precinct.

In the shadows of the city's new religious buildings grows a proliferation of smaller and more eclectic congregations. It's not uncommon for four or more congregations, each speaking a different language and professing a different faith, to share the same facility. This is particularly true of the more evangelical churches, whose rapid growth has yet to bring them the economic power to find permanent spaces amid L.A.'s high-cost real estate. Still, according to the American Religion Data Archive, the number of places of worship in the L.A. area in 2000 rose by about 400 over the previous 10 years.

Established religious institutions, although more well heeled than storefront houses of worship, may be unprepared to adjust to the fast-changing diversification of religious life. The Jewish Federation, for example, the traditional bulwark of the city's 600,000 Jews, is a diminishing force. Despite the growth of L.A.'s Jewish community in both numbers and wealth, says Rob Eshman, editor of the Los Angeles Jewish Journal, the federation annually raises about the same amount of money as it did a decade ago.

Instead, Eshman says, more Jewish money is flowing to specialized institutions like the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Skirball Cultural Center and the Museum of Tolerance. Fund-raising also is increasingly connected to the region's 30 Hebrew day schools that educate about 10,000 Jewish children, according to the Bureau of Jewish Education. "You have a kind of entrepreneurial spirit in the L.A. Jewish community that's also very dynamic and fragmented," Eshman says. "The overall organization of the community tends to be relatively weak, but the individual synagogues are very strong."

Greater ethnic diversity also has changed the profile of the city's Jewish community. First-generation immigrants and their offspring make up nearly 45% of the L.A. Jewish community. This has led to the establishment of numerous shuls, some of which attempt to maintain Jewish practices that originated in places like Iran and elsewhere in the Near East, where Jewish roots are deeper than in Christian Europe.

Similar patterns are evident in the growth of Christian churches. Largely because of the influx of Latino immigrants, the Catholic Church gained about 1.5 million adherents in the 1990s, a 34% increase over the previous decade. As a result, Catholicism is once again the region's predominant faith.

Although the sexual-abuse scandal has tarnished the reputation of the L.A. archdiocese and threatens to strain church finances, grass-roots Catholic religious life in Los Angeles continues to expand, with virtually all parishes reporting increases in attendance and social activities, according to Kevin O'Connor, director of development for the archdiocese. In much of the city, the church has become increasingly Spanish-speaking, but Mass is also celebrated in at least 30 languages every weekend.

Mainline Protestantism and more traditional fundamentalist groups have not fared as well.  Yet, many Protestant groups are expanding their social services and redirecting their ministries to accommodate the region's changing population. The United Methodist Church, which shrank by nearly one-quarter during the 1990s, recently established 12 new ministries, 11 of which target Spanish, Chinese or other non-English-speaking constituencies.

But the most dramatic growth is in religions that historically have been outside the mainstream.  The largest number of new building projects is being undertaken by evangelical Christian groups like the Assemblies of God.  Pentecostal churches are the fastest-growing of all denominations in terms of membership.  Many of these churches, such as the Vineyard in Santa Monica or the Oasis in Mid-Wilshire, are Southern Californian in their lack of traditional focus.  Their strong emphasis on music and contemporary sermonizing appeals to a wide range of urbanites, among them singles, divorced parents and others alienated from more traditional churches.

[EDITORIAL NOTE:  Many of the region's new evangelical megachurches are independent or nondenominational in character, which indicates a turning away from traditional denominational structures to a freer life-style; examples of these are Faithful Central Bible Church (Bishop Kenneth Ulmer) in Los Angeles; the Dream Center (Pastor Mathew Barnett) in Los Angeles; Harvest Rock Church (Pastor Che Ahn) in Pasadena; Faith Community Church (Pastor Jim Reeve) in West Covina; and Mariners Church (Pastor Kenton Beshore) in Irvine and Saddleback Church (Pastor Rick Warren) in Lake Forest, both in Orange County.]

These churches also have expanded their appeal beyond their traditional Anglo and African American congregants to recently arrived Latinos and Asians. For many newcomers, the evangelical message of close communion with God, discipline and self-help is a powerful magnet.

But not all newcomers to L.A., Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties are gathering under the tent of [Protestant] evangelism.  Faiths once tiny in the area -- Buddhism, Bahai, Islam and Hinduism -- are gaining followers, including converts from other religious communities.  The four-county area has more than 100 Bahai centers with more than 10,000 members, and 76 mosques serving about 153,000 Muslims.  As many as 40% of the nation's 1.4 million Buddhists live in Southern California.

The upsurge in religious activities may be a better harbinger of L.A.'s arrival as a world city than the newest high-rise office building, museum or sport stadium.  Like its population and cultures, L.A.'s religiosity has many faces and speaks in many tongues. Yet, the city is increasingly demonstrating how faith can be a common ground.  The greater cooperation among L.A.'s religious congregations serves not only the spiritual but also the physical, emotional and social needs of the city's diverse communities.

These multifaceted religious efforts represent a critical element in the maturation and humanization of our urban society.  Religious faith is often banished to the sidelines in our secularized culture; it's expansion may prove the most irreducible asset in helping create a true city of angels.

SOURCE:  http://www.joelkotkin.com/Religion/LAT%20A%20Revival%20Under%20Many%20Tents%20in%20L.A..htm


L.A.'s Stained Glass Blessing:  St. James in the City Episcopal Church

How one Wishire District church has changed over time:  1927 - 2007.

By Paul Pringle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
September 30, 2007


As Downtown Revives, so do Congregations

A growing, diverse population in the L.A. neighborhood results in new parishes and bigger old ones.

By K. Connie Kang, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
March 15, 2008



Compare the parallel history of religion
among the major race-ethnic groups in Los Angeles


Ethnic /Ancestry and Religious Info & Histories

  
       The Hispanic American Community

The Asian American & Pacific Islander Communities (an overview of all subgroups)

    City of Los Angeles
    County of Los Angeles
    County of Orange

The African American Community

The Arab Community

The Armenian Community

The Jewish Community

The Native American Indian Community


U.S. Department of Commerce/U.S. Census Bureau:  PRESS RELEASE

18 September 2003

First County Population Estimates by Race and Ethnicity Since 2000 Show Diversity Changing Local Demographics

The U.S. Census Bureau today issued its first county population estimates by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin since Census 2000, pinpointing at the local level what was previously found to be the case for the nation and the states -— that America is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse.  The estimates for the nation's 3,141 counties were as of July 1, 2002.  The race data presented below cover the population who reported as one race alone or as one race in combination with one or more races. The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as distinct concepts.   Separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race.  For further details, see U.S. Census Bureau Guidance on the Presentation and Comparison of Race and Hispanic-Origin Data (June 12, 2003).

The findings which follow are for counties with a minimum population of 100,000:

- American Indians and Alaska natives -— Los Angeles County, CA, had the largest population (156,000); in Navajo County, Ariz., American Indians made up the highest percentage of the total population (50 percent); another Arizona county, Maricopa, had the largest numerical increase from 2000 to 2002 (9,000) and Fairfax County, Va., showed the highest percentage jump (45 percent).

- Asians -— Los Angeles County, CA, had the largest population (1.3 million) and the largest numerical increase (47,000); in Honolulu County, Hawaii, Asians made up the highest share of the total population (62 percent); and Forsyth County, GA., had the largest percentage increase (139 percent).

- Blacks -— Cook County, Ill., had the largest population (1.4 million); in Orleans Parish, LA., blacks made up the highest proportion of the total (68 percent); Broward County, FL., had the largest numerical increase from 2000 to 2002 (50,000); and Forsyth County, GA., the largest percentage increase (88 percent).

- Hispanics (may be of any race) -— Los Angeles County, CA, had the largest population (4.5 million) and numerical increase (300,000); Webb County, Texas, was the county where Hispanics comprised the highest proportion of the total population (95 percent); and Henry County, GA., had the largest percentage increase (46 percent).

SOURCE:  http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2003/cb03-143.html